Cat Fanciers' Association DNA Test

Item No.  488

This testing program is a cooperative effort by the Cat Fanciers' Association, Inc. (CFA) and Neogen. Together, we offer affordable DNA testing services to breeders, veterinarians, cat lovers and all who seek feline DNA testing for outstanding, healthier cats. Customers do not need to be a CFA member or have a registered cat to submit samples.

The CFA DNA panel provides insight into inherited health conditions and physical traits, facilitating better management of parent selection and prompt diagnosis and treatment of disease.

The testing panel also includes a set of DNA markers used to create a unique identification profile for each cat. These profiles can be compared between parent and offspring to verify pedigree relationships or confirm the identity of a cat.

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$45.00
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Expect availability in 2-4 weeks
Minimum quantity required: 1
This item must be ordered in multiples of one case. Quantity per case: 1

Additional Testing

Additional testing is available to add in the next step when uploading your submission form.

The CFA Basic Panel includes the following tests:

Identification Profile & Parentage

110 markers recommended by the International Society of Animal Genetics used to create a unique identification profile for each cat. Please indicate during the ordering process if you wish to compare offspring to a parent or trio of queen and Tom that also has a DNA identity profile in the Neogen database.

Note: These markers to not indicate breed or correlate to a specific health or physical trait. The data in the profile generated belongs to the individual who submitted the sample for testing. Written permission must be granted to use an animal's data for comparison to a cat owned by another party.

Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS)

Storage disorder which causes changes in physical appearance such as a flat, broad face, large head, small ears and thick skin over the neck as well as abnormalities with body system function. Clinical signs are typically visible in the first few months of life. MPS has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, carriers will not be sick, but could pass a risk allele to their offspring.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
MPS VI - "Severe form", ARSB - c.1427 T>C Siamese Recessive
MPS VII, GUSB - c. Siamese Recessive

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

Genetic defect that leads to blindness. Two variants are included in the test with onset of vision loss at different stages in life:

CEP290 / rdAc

"Late onset" blindness. Kittens are born without any abnormalities in the eyes, but lesions develop slowly over time. Clinical signs can be noticed as early as 1-2 years of age and loss of vision continues slowly until the cat reaches 4-7 years of age. Late onset PRA has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, carriers will not be sick, but could pass a risk allele to their offspring.

CRX / Rdy

"Early onset" blindness. Clinical signs are typically evident by 4-5 weeks of age with blindness evident in the first 4 months of life. Early onset PRA has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and cats who carry the mutation may show signs of blindness.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
rdAc, CEP290 - IVS50 + 9T>G Abyssinian, Somali, Siamese Recessive
Rdy, CRX - c.546delC Abyssinian Dominant

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PK Deficiency)

This genetic mutation results in an abnormality of an enzyme that results in red blood cells that break down easily resulting in hemolytic anemia. Signs of disease include weakness, weight loss, jaundice and abdominal enlargement. PK Deficiency has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Carriers will not be sick, but could pass a risk allele to their offspring.

Note: this test has a risk of producing "false positive" carriers (+/-). It is to be used as a screening test with carriers (+/-) bred to known free cats or confirmed with a secondary test platform.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
PKLR - G>A transition in intron 5 Bengal, Egyptian Mau, La Perm, Maine Coon, Norwegian Forest Cat, Savannah, Siberian, Singapura, Abyssinian and Somali Recessive

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the Ragdoll

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the heart that results in thickening or “hypertrophy” of the heart muscle. Genetics is a factor in development of HCM, but cats of other breeds and cats who are free of the mutation may also get this disease. This variant is only relevant in the Ragdoll breed. HCM in the Ragdoll is suspected to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Carriers of the disease may be affected, but age of diagnosis for affected cats can vary widely from kitten to adulthood.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
MYBPC3 - c.2460 C>T Ragdoll Dominant

Physical Traits

  • Agouti: Mutation in the ASIP gene which affects how pigment is distributed in the hair shaft creating banded fur. Banded fur can alternate in various types of patterns with solid color which is called tabbying. Note: Tabby pattern is not determined by this test.
  • Dilute: Phenotype that results from a mutation in the MLPH gene. Dilute colors can be described as blue, lilac, fawn or cream.
  • Brown: Determines if an individual carries the chocolate or cinnamon gene for coat color.
  • Hair length:Four mutations in the FGF5 gene are targeted which will identify potential for longhaired kittens as an outcome of a planned mating.
Specifications
Species Feline
Turnaround Time Approximately 2-3 weeks

Additional Information

The following tests can also be run with the CFA DNA Test:

Type B Blood Type

This test determines if a cat has the Type B blood type or carries an allele for this blood type that could be passed on to their offspring. Identifying queens who have type B blood is important as type A kittens born to a type B queen could have a fatal reaction called neonatal isoerythrolysis (fading kitten syndrome).

Note: This test does not determine whether cats are Type A or AB blood type.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
CMAH - Exon 2, 136 G>A
CMAH - c.1del-53-70
High prevalence of type B: British shorthair, Birman, Devon and Cornish Rex
Fixed for type A: Siamese, Tonkinese, Burmese
Recessive

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

PKD is characterized by the development of fluid filled sacs (cysts) in the kidneys.

The cysts increase in number and size over time and overwhelm the ability of the kidneys to function properly resulting in renal failure. Cysts may be present at birth in affected cats, but disease may not be clinically evident until later, typically before 7 years of age. This condition is autosomal dominant trait. Cats who carry the mutation may be clinically affected.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
PKD1 - c.10063 C>A Many, Persian, Burmilla Dominant

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the Maine Coon

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the heart that results in thickening or “hypertrophy” of the heart muscle. Genetics is a factor in development of HCM, but cats of other breeds and cats who are free of the mutation may also get this disease. This variant is only relevant in the Maine Coon. This mutation is autosomal dominant, but has incomplete penetrance meaning that not all cats with the mutation will exhibit clinical symptoms. Penetrance for heterozygous cats (+/-) has been estimated at 30%, and penetrance for homozygous cats (+/+) has been estimated at 80%. For example, it is estimated that 80% of Maine Coon cats homozygous for this mutation will eventually develop disease, while 20% will not. The risk of disease with these mutations (disease penetrance) does increase with age.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
MYBPC3 - c.93 G>C Maine Coon Recessive

Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Disorder in Maine Coon cats that results in a loss of nerve cells. Clinical signs include weakness and instability typically evident by 5 months of age.

Variant targeted Breed affected Mode of Inheritance
LIX1 gene Maine Coon Recessive

Color Points & Albinism

Identifies genetic mutations that result in greater pigmentation (darker color) at the extremities (ears, paws) where the temperature is cooler.

cs allele / Siamese Pigmented fur only at the extremities, torso is very light (or white) and blue eye color
cb allele / Burmese Greatest pigmentation at the extremities and less on the torso
c allele / Albino Very rare - complete lack of pigment in the hair, skin and eyes

Note: Cats who have both the cs and cb allele are an intermediate phenotype, Tonkinese


Training

Our customers’ success is our shared success. Our customer service teams are ready to assist you and your team on our solutions, so you can rest easy knowing sampling procedures are performed properly and yield accurate results. (Link to Global GN contact page)


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